Freight Market Update: July 11, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – Extreme Weather Alert]

  • Vessels have resumed transiting around the Cape of Good Hope, following the extreme weather in the region earlier. Wave heights have reduced to 23-26 feet and are expected to continue decreasing. Estimated arrival times for vessels have been delayed by 24-48 hours, and some vessel bunching may occur at ports globally.

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • Volumes remain strong, surpassing last year’s numbers on Transpacific routes. However, structurally blank sailings have occurred due to Cape of Good Hope (COGH) routings and port congestion in Asia and North America. We see more premium offerings from shipping lines with expedited services and equipment and space guarantees, while other carriers try to reduce the backlog in Asia with extra loader (XL) space. With XL space to the Pacific Southwest (PSW), the situation is improving week over week, while the East Coast (EC) remains heavily overbooked.
  • Floating rates: The General Rate Increase (GRI) for July was successfully implemented on all Transpacific Eastbound gateways based on the peak conditions we’re seeing this month. Shipping lines adjusted rates to the EC twice as much as to the West Coast (WC) to manage the massive booking intake. We’re seeing the first signs that rates will get extended into the second half of July.
  • Fixed rates: Carriers shared the new Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) for July 1, marking another increase after two successful implementation rounds. We’re expecting that the PSS will get extended into the second half of July.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • Equipment shortages and port congestion in Asia are improving, but on-time performance still falls short of 50% (per the latest Sea-Intelligence report). There are 10 blank sailings announced for Asia-North Europe in the second half of July and August.
  • Floating rates rose again for the second half of July (by $500-800 per 40-foot container). Vessels remain full as the capacity cuts and bookings kick in, and customers are still looking for earlier estimated times of departure (ETDs) to mitigate cargo delays.
  • Premium options are still available for getting cargo loaded on earlier departure dates with higher equipment priority, which can mitigate the risk of rolling or no equipment.

[Ocean – TAWB]

  • The congestion in the Mediterranean, along with schedule reliability issues and blank sailings, remains the same, leading to increased rates for July.
  • North Europe demand has not been affected by the reduced capacity, and the majority of carriers are extending their rate levels until the end of Q3.
  • Equipment deficits in certain areas of South/East Germany and the Hinterlands remain an issue.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 1-2 weeks in advance for bookings Ex. North Europe, and 2-3 weeks in advance for bookings ex Mediterranean that are loading at a coastal port.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Ocean rates for Q3 are increasing in corridors of the U.S. export market due to rising demand in global container markets.
  • Congestion at critical transhipment hubs is reducing effective capacity for U.S. exporters.
  • Navigating the ever-changing earliest return dates (ERDs) has become increasingly challenging due to current market congestion.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 3-4 weeks in advance for shipments loading at a coastal port, and 4+ weeks in advance for shipments loading at an inland rail point.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD and TAC Index)

  • Global tonnages (+10%) and rates (+9%) continue to show strong YoY improvements, driven by the Red Sea crisis and e-commerce. That said, there are major differences across trade lanes.
  • Continuous rate increases in Asia (+18% YoY) and the Indian subcontinent (+55% YoY) over the past 5 weeks have been driven by ocean to air conversions.
  • American and European export rates declined YoY due to additional passenger capacity (passenger travel is on the rise).
  • Rates from major China hubs have slowly but continuously creeped up since Q1, reaching more than $6/kg at quarter-end in June. They should stabilize in July (a slow ecommerce season), then ramp back up in September.
  • Rates have risen dramatically from Southeast Asia origins, particularly Vietnam, driven by increased demand (ocean to air conversions) and congestion at major CN/HK hubs due to e-commerce. Express shipments from Vietnam reached > $10/kg at quarter-end.
  • Rates from the Indian Subcontinent remain elevated, with backlogs at most major Indian airports and severe congestion in Bangladesh.
  • Ecommerce players expect a strong peak season with 20-30% more volume (and up to 60% more volume in the weeks leading up to Black Friday).
  • Traditional shippers are expecting strong Q4 sales. In particular, we expect strong volumes from Apple launches (the iPhone 16 contains a number of new features).
  • Capacity is largely sold out from Asia for Q4 2024. Most Asian carriers are sold out of their ad hoc charter capacity until the end of the year, and sold > 85% of scheduled capacity. European, U.S., and Middle Eastern carriers (including Flexport on our own charters) have sold > 80% of their fixed capacity already, only setting aside space for profitable spots.
  • Flexport advises that shippers reserve capacity as soon as possible. Focus on forwarders that have strong Block Space Agreements (BSAs) and a solid charter base to mitigate delays, be flexible with booking sizes, and explore creative routing for cargo that can wait.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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North America Freight Market Update Live

Thursday, July 11 at 9:00 am PT / 12:00 pm ET

Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators explore a new trajectory for Europe while returning to former patterns for U.S.-bound routes.

Week to July 8, 2024

This week, the Ocean Timeliness Indicator for China to the U.S. East Coast continues its ascent after its first decrease in 6 weeks, going from 59 days to 62 days. In a similar upturn, the OTI for China to the U.S. West Coast also increased from 38.5 days to 40 days. Last but not least, China to Northern Europe OTIs also began rising, with a small uptick from 66 days to 66.5 days due to port congestion nearing pandemic highs, and also delays caused by extreme weather around the Cape of Good Hope.

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Please direct questions about the Flexport OTI to press@flexport.com.

See the full report and read about our methodology here.

The contents of this report are made available for informational purposes only. Flexport does not guarantee, represent, or warrant any of the contents of this report because they are based on our current beliefs, expectations, and assumptions, about which there can be no assurance due to various anticipated and unanticipated events that may occur. Neither Flexport nor its advisors or affiliates shall be liable for any losses that arise in any way due to the reliance on the contents contained in this report.

 

Source from Flexport.com

 

Freight Market Update: July 3, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • Volumes remain strong, surpassing last year’s numbers on Transpacific routes. However, structurally blank sailings have occurred due to Cape of Good Hope (COGH) routings and port congestion in Asia and North America. Shipping lines are offering more premium services with expedited options, equipment, and space guarantees. Meanwhile, other carriers are reducing backlogs in Asia with extra loader (XL) space. This XL space to the Pacific Southwest (PSW) has improved the situation week over week, though the East Coast (EC) remains heavily overbooked.
  • Floating rates: The General Rate Increase (GRI) for July was successfully implemented across all Transpacific Eastbound gateways, driven by peak conditions. Shipping lines adjusted rates to the EC twice as much as to the West Coast (WC) to manage high booking volumes.
  • Fixed rates: Carriers have announced the new Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) for July 1, marking another increase following two successful implementation rounds.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • Equipment shortages and port congestion in Asia are improving but still can’t fully support current demand, with blank sailings expected in July and August.
  • Demand remains strong, but slightly decreased compared to previous weeks. Floating rates have risen again for the first half of July, with a $1,500-2000 increase per 40-foot container. Customers are expected to keep pushing cargo out to avoid further delays.
  • Premium options are still available for prioritizing equipment and securing earlier departure dates, reducing the risk of rolling or no equipment.
  • Flexport continues to monitor the situation and advises booking early, placing bookings in smaller slots, and picking up empty containers as soon as possible. For urgent cargo with a target delivery date, we recommend using premium options as early as possible.

[Ocean – TAWB]

  • Capacity is reducing in Europe, affecting both North and South Europe, due to the diversion of vessels to the TPEB and FEWB, and ISC to EU services, along with the merging of services by certain carriers.
  • Congestion in the Mediterranean, coupled with schedule reliability issues and blank sailings, has pushed carrier utilization to 100%, leading to increased rates in July for both the West and East Mediterranean.
  • Demand in North Europe remains stable, with rates holding steady. However, equipment deficits persist in certain areas of South/East Germany and the Hinterlands.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 1-2 weeks in advance for shipments from North Europe and 2-3 weeks in advance for shipments from the Mediterranean that are loading at a coastal port.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Ocean rates are increasing for Q3 in corridors of the U.S. export market due to rising demand in global container markets.
  • Congestion at critical transhipment hubs is reducing effective capacity for U.S. exporters.
  • Navigating the ever-changing earliest return dates (ERDs) has become increasingly challenging due to current market congestion.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 3-4 weeks in advance for shipments loading at a coastal port, and 4+ weeks in advance for shipments loading at an inland rail point.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • In the week of June 17-23, 2024 (week 25), global air cargo tonnage dropped by 5%, but average rates increased slightly by 1% to $2.54 per kilo, which is 10% higher than the same week last year and 43% above June 2019 pre-COVID levels.
  • A combined analysis of weeks 24 and 25 shows a 3% drop in tonnage compared to the previous two weeks, with a significant 10% drop from Middle East & South Asia (MESA) origins. Rates from MESA rose by 5% and are up 57% year-on-year.
  • Outbound air cargo tonnage saw double-digit drops from several predominantly Muslim countries between weeks 24 and 25, including Turkey (-69%), Saudi Arabia (-66%), Egypt (-46%), and Pakistan (-39%).
  • Average spot rates from MESA to Europe in week 25 remain highly inflated compared to last year, with notable rates including $4.29/kg from Bangladesh (+165% YoY), $3.65/kg from India (+159% YoY), and $2.36/kg from Dubai (+84% YoY).

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators are exploring a new trajectory for Europe while restoring former patterns for U.S.-bound routes

Week to July 1, 2024

This week, the Ocean Timeliness Indicator for China to the U.S. East Coast corrected course with a noticeable uptick after its first decrease in 6 weeks, returning to 59 days from 58 days. In a similar upturn, OTI for China to the U.S. West Coast also increased back to 38.5 days from 37 days. It is, however, China to Northern Europe OTI’s turn this week to decrease from 67 days to 66 days, possibly due to growing port congestion in Asia.

 

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Please direct questions about the Flexport OTI to press@flexport.com.

See the full report and read about our methodology here.

The contents of this report are made available for informational purposes only. Flexport does not guarantee, represent, or warrant any of the contents of this report because they are based on our current beliefs, expectations, and assumptions, about which there can be no assurance due to various anticipated and unanticipated events that may occur. Neither Flexport nor its advisors or affiliates shall be liable for any losses that arise in any way due to the reliance on the contents contained in this report.

About the Author

Freight Market Update: June 27, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • Volumes remain strong and exceed last year’s numbers on the Transpacific route, despite structurally blank sailings caused by Cape of Good Hope (COGH) routings and port congestion in Asia and North America. Shipping lines are offering more services, including expedited service and equipment and space guarantees, while other carriers are attempting to reduce the backlog in Asia with extra loader (XL) space. Due to XL space en route to the Pacific Southwest (PSW), we see that the situation is improving week over week, although the East Coast (EC) is still heavily overbooked.
  • Floating rates: All General Rate Increases (GRIs) for June have been implemented, with further rounds expected for all Transpacific Eastbound gateways due to peak conditions anticipated in July. Shipping lines will adjust rates to the EC twice as much as to the West Coast (WC) to manage high booking volumes.
  • Fixed rates: Carriers have announced the new Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) for July 1st, marking another increase after two successful implementation rounds earlier this year.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • Equipment shortages have become severe in most of Asia’s main loading ports. Liners are repositioning empty containers to improve the situation, but with continued vessel delays caused by rerouting via the Cape of Good Hope, we foresee these issues persisting in the coming weeks.
  • Port congestion in Asia is easing, though shippers still face an additional 2-3 days in berthing lead time.
  • Demand remains stronger than usual, with rates rising again in the first half of July (a $1,500-2000 increase per 40-foot container). Due to equipment shortages, we expect that customers will keep pushing cargo out to avoid further delays. Liners are announcing blank sailings for July & August already, expecting that market space will remain critical in the coming weeks.
  • Shippers are pushing for earlier cargo departures to avoid further freight cost increases. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are currently full. To expedite cargo departures and avoid delays, more carriers are open to premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Flexport is continuing to monitor the situation and advises booking early, placing bookings in smaller slots, and picking up empty containers as soon as possible. For urgent cargo with a target delivery date, we recommend choosing premium options as early as possible.

[Ocean – TAWB]

  • In North Europe, demand is stable, and carriers are extending their rate levels until August and September. However, there are equipment issues in Southern and Eastern Germany and the Hinterlands, including Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, and Switzerland.
  • In the West Mediterranean, congestion and equipment issues at certain main ports, coupled with reduced schedule reliability, are impacting the market. Carriers are implementing increases starting in July, as demand picks up.
  • The East Mediterranean is also experiencing the effects of congestion in Mediterranean ports. Some carriers have announced equipment imbalance and operational charges in response to increased costs along the Mediterranean to U.S. routes, as well as equipment availability issues in certain areas of Turkey, Greece, and Egypt.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 2-3 weeks in advance.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Ocean rates for Q3 are increasing in the broader U.S. export market, driven by rising rates in global container markets.
  • Congested key destination transhipment hubs for U.S. exporters include ports in Asia and the Mediterranean.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 3-4 weeks in advance for coastal port loadings, and 4+ weeks in advance for inland rail point loadings.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • From January to May 2024, total worldwide chargeable weight was up by 12% year over year (YoY), driven by strong growth in cross-border e-commerce and sea-to-air conversions.
  • General cargo growth: General cargo air freight tonnages rose by 13% YoY in the first five months of 2024, surpassing the 10% growth in special cargo.
  • Regional performance: The Asia-Pacific and Middle East and South Asia (MESA) regions experienced significant YoY increases in chargeable weight, with the Asia-Pacific up 20% and MESA up 22%, both driven by strong cross-border e-commerce and sea-to-air conversions.
  • Product category trends: Vulnerable/high-tech cargo and meat shipments grew by 25% each. Dangerous goods and pharma/temperature-controlled traffic grew by only 2% and 1%, respectively. Fish and seafood shipments declined by 1%, and live animal shipments dropped by 7%.
  • Rate stability: Air cargo rates are holding firm at an average of $2.51 per kilo, up 8% YoY and 42% above pre-COVID levels, driven by strong demand and high spot rates from Asian and Middle Eastern origins.
  • Market dynamics: Despite a 2% slip in worldwide tonnages in mid-June, a two-week comparison shows a 1% rise in both rates and tonnages, with significant rate increases on lanes such as Asia Pacific-USA and China-USA, and a notable impact from canceled freighters from China to LAX.
  • Capacity platforms: Freighters showed weaker growth (+6% YoY) than passenger aircraft and mixed fleets, both of which grew by 13% in the first five months of 2024.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators Remain Stagnant or Decrease Across All Major Trade Lanes

Week to June 24, 2024

This week, the Ocean Timeliness Indicator for China to the U.S. East Coast decreased for the first time in 6 weeks, falling to 58 days. China to the U.S. West Coast OTI also decreased to 37 days. China to Northern Europe OTI remained stagnant at 67 days due to routing around the Cape of Good Hope.

 

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: June 20, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • Volumes remain very strong and exceed last year’s numbers on the Transpacific route, despite structurally blank sailings due to Cape of Good Hope (COGH) routings and port congestion in Asia and North America. We’re seeing more premium offerings from shipping lines, featuring expedited services and guaranteed equipment and space, while other carriers attempt to reduce the backlog in Asia with extra loader space.
  • Floating rates: All General Rate Increases (GRIs) for June have been maintained, with further rounds to be implemented on all Transpacific Eastbound gateways, based on the peak conditions anticipated for June and July. Carriers expect these rate hikes to persist and accelerate in the short term, as vessels departing Asia are expected to be full through June. The Pacific Southwest is at full capacity, while the Pacific Northwest will be near full capacity by the end of month and into July. The route from Vietnam and South/East China (Yantian/Shanghai/Ningbo) to the Pacific Southwest is particularly tight.
  • Fixed rates: Carriers successfully raised the Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) on June 15, with additional increases already announced for July.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • Equipment shortages have become severe in most of Asia’s main loading ports. Liners are repositioning empty containers to improve the situation, but with the continued delays on vessels rerouting via the Cape of Good Hope, we foresee this issue persisting in the coming weeks.
  • Port congestion in Asia remains high due to elevated yard utilization, unexpected bad weather, and vessel bunching, leading to low terminal operation efficiency and long wait times. This situation has led to last-minute port omissions by carriers trying to catch up with transit timing.
  • The port strikes at Bremerhaven, Hamburg, and Le Havre have not affected schedules yet, but hinterland networks are at risk of delays. Clients importing cargo to Germany and France should closely monitor deliveries, as the strikes could extend into July if the unions do not receive a satisfactory response from the government to their demands.
  • Demand continues to be stronger than usual, and rates rose again for the second half of June ($1,500-2000 increase per 40-foot container). With equipment shortages, customers are likely to keep pushing cargo out to avoid further delays. Liners are preparing for the next General Rate Increase in the first half of July by another $1000 per 40-foot container.
  • Shippers are pushing cargo for earlier departures to avoid further freight cost increases. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are full. To push cargo out at earlier estimated times of departure (ETD) and avoid delays, more carriers are open to premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Flexport continues to monitor the situation and advises booking early, placing bookings in smaller slots, and picking up empty containers as soon as possible. For urgent cargo with a target delivery date, it is recommended to opt for the premium option as early as possible.

[Ocean – TAWB]

  • In Northern Europe, demand remains stable, and carriers are responding by extending their rate levels until July.
  • There are equipment issues in Southern and Eastern Germany and the Hinterlands (Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Switzerland).
  • In the Western Mediterranean (WMED), congestion and equipment issues at key ports, along with reduced schedule reliability, are impacting the market. Carriers are planning to implement General Rate Increases from July, following the demand (250-350/TEU).
  • The Eastern Mediterranean (EMED) is also experiencing the effects of congestion at Mediterranean ports. Some carriers have announced equipment imbalance and operational charges due to increased costs on routes from the Mediterranean to the US and equipment availability issues in specific areas of Turkey, Greece, and Egypt.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, it is recommended to book 2-3 weeks in advance.

[Ocean – Indian Subcontinent]

  • Capacity is constrained due to blank sailings and increased demand from Indian Subcontinent (ISC) countries, as well as Southeast Asia and China. Rising demand from Southeast Asia and China has created a capacity crunch for the ISC region, since many services are shared.
  • Rates continued to increase week over week, except for the Northwest India to US East Coast (USEC) lanes.
  • Outlook continued blank sailings are expected from Northwest India to USEC. As a result, we can expect stabilized rates and potentially some upward momentum if the rate of blank sailings increases.
  • News: CMA and HPL have announced that they will no longer cooperate on the INDAMEX and IN2 services. Instead, they will each launch their own services, both named the INDAMEX. This increase in services will not significantly impact available capacity, most of which already existed in the market and is merely being redistributed.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Extended transit times caused by routing around the Cape of Good Hope and growing congestion at key ports in Asia and Europe are further exacerbating the container equipment situation for US exporters, particularly for shippers loading at inland rail points.
  • Congested key destination transhipment hubs for US exporters include Asia base ports and Strait of Gibraltar ports Tanger-Med and Algeciras.
  • Due to operational constraints at the Port of Charleston, we are seeing vessel omissions for Transatlantic and Transpacific services, with some shifts to services calling at the Port of Savannah instead.
  • With schedule reliability impacted by global disruptions, irregularities in managing earliest return dates (ERDs) for delivering laden containers to loading point are expected.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, it is recommended to book 3-4 weeks in advance for bookings loading at a coastal port and 4+ weeks in advance for bookings loading at an inland rail point.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Asia Pacific air cargo surge: Air cargo demand and rates from Asia Pacific origins increased year-on-year (YoY) by 20% in tonnage and 16% in rates for the last two weeks (weeks 22 and 23) up to June 9, 2024. Spot rates from Vietnam to Europe rose by 143% YoY, reaching $4.47 per kilo, with tonnages up 28% YoY.
  • Spot rate variations: Significant YoY increases in spot rates to Europe were observed from several Asia Pacific origin markets in week 23, including China (+32%), Hong Kong (+18%), Malaysia (+83%), Indonesia (+46%), and Thailand (+43%). The average spot rate from Asia Pacific to the USA stood at $5.23 per kilo (+51% YoY), and from China at $5.30 per kilo (+38% YoY).
  • Middle East & South Asia (MESA) boom: MESA origin rates to Europe more than doubled YoY for the last ten weeks, driven by high prices from India and Bangladesh. Overall, rates from MESA origins worldwide increased by 50% YoY in weeks 22 and 23, while average worldwide rates remained firm at $2.52 per kilo, despite declines from Europe (-16%) and North America (-11%).
  • Global air cargo trends: Despite a slight decline in worldwide chargeable weight flown (-1%) compared to the previous two weeks, worldwide tonnages rose by 12% YoY in weeks 22 and 23.
  • Capacity shortages: Air and ocean freight capacity shortages, exacerbated by disrupted sea freight services due to Red Sea attacks, port congestion, and vessel capacity shortages, have driven more cargo owners to opt for air cargo solutions, significantly impacting spot rates and demand across various Asia Pacific origin markets.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators for China to U.S. East Coast and China to Northern Europe Increases for the Fifth Straight Week

Week to June 17, 2024

This week, the Ocean Timeliness Indicator for China to the U.S. East Coast and China to Northern Europe continued an increase seen throughout May and June. The China to the U.S. East Coast OTI increased to 61 Days, and the China to Northern Europe OTI increased to 67 days due to routing around the Cape of Good. However, the China to the U.S. West Coast OTI decreased to 38 days.

 

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: June 13, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • Volumes continue to be very strong and above last year’s numbers on Transpacific while we see structurally blank sailings due to Cape of Good Hope (COGH) routings and port congestion in Asia and North America.
  • Floating rates: All general rate increases for the month of June have stuck, with further rounds to be implemented on all Transpacific Eastbound gateways based on the peak conditions we are seeing in June and July. Carriers expect these rate hikes to stick and accelerate in the short term, since vessels leaving Asia are expected to be full through June: Pacific Southwest is full; Pacific Northwest is close to full into the end of month and into June. Particularly Vietnam + South/East China (Yantian/Shanghai/Ningbo) into the Pacific Southwest is especially tight.
  • Fixed rates: Carriers successfully implemented a Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) on June 1, and the PSS will be increased again on June 15 while further adjustments are already announced for July.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • Equipment shortages became severe in most of Asia’s main loading ports and liners are repositioning empty containers to improve the situation, but with the continued delays on vessels rerouting via Cape of Good Hope, we foresee it may continue in coming weeks.
  • Port congestion in Asia remains severe mainly due to high yard utilization, unexpected bad weather and vessel bunching, leading to low terminal operation efficiency and long waiting times, causing last-minute port omission by carriers to catch up with the transit time.
  • Demand continues to be stronger than usual and rates rose again for the second half of June ($1,500-2000 increase per 40-foot container). We expect the increase in demand to be driven not only by consumer demand but also by companies building stock due to the longer than anticipated lead times and companies trying to secure space.
  • Carriers are increasing the PSS quantum to $1000-1500/TEU, aiming for existing long-term fixed deals.
  • Shippers continue to push cargo for earlier departure to avoid further freight cost increases. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are full. To push cargo on sooner estimated time of departure (ETD) and avoid delays, more carriers are open to Premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Flexport continues to monitor the situation and we advise to book early, place bookings in smaller slots and pick up empty containers as soon as possible. For urgent cargo with a target delivery date, it is recommended to move on the Premium option as early as possible.

[Ocean – TAWB]

  • In North Europe, the demand is stable and carriers are following the trend by extending their rate levels until July.
  • There are equipment issues in Southern and Eastern Germany and the Hinterlands (Austria, Hungary, Slovakia).
  • In the Western Mediterranean, congestion and equipment issues in certain main ports, along with reduced schedule reliability, have impacted the market. Carriers are implementing GRI/PSS from July following the demand.
  • In the Eastern Mediterranean, equipment availability is good and there is no severe congestion in the ports.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 2 to 3 weeks in advance.

[Operations – Canada]

  • Border-Agent Union Negotiations: At the time of publishing, a tentative agreement has been reached for 9,000 workers at Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and a strike has been avoided. Full details of the agreement are to be announced on June 13.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Extended transit times due to routing around Cape of Good Hope and growing congestion at key ports further devolves the container equipment situation for U.S. exporters, especially shippers loading at inland rail points.
  • Congestion at key destination transhipment hubs for U.S. exporters include ports in Asia and Strait of Gibraltar ports Tanger-Med and Algeciras.
  • Due to operational constraints at the Port of Charleston, we are seeing vessel omission for Transatlantic and Transpacific services.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, we recommend booking 3-4 weeks in advance for bookings loading at a coastal port and 4+ weeks in advance for bookings loading at an inland rail point.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Air cargo rates from Middle East & South Asia (MESA) to Europe averaged over twice their level from May last year, with May’s average spot rate at $3.35 per kilo, up 128% YoY.
  • Elevated spot prices from India to Europe ($3.78 per kilo, +160%) and Bangladesh to Europe ($4.38 per kilo, +189%) contributed to increases in overall average rates from MESA origins to Europe (up by 77% YoY).
  • Asia Pacific origins saw a 21% rise in tonnages in May YoY, with air cargo rates rising nearly 12%, marking the first significant YoY full-month increase this year.
  • Global average air cargo rates remained steady at $2.51 per kilo in week 22, up 1% WoW and 7% YoY, with overall rates in May up by 3% YoY and chargeable weight up by 13% YoY.
  • Global average air cargo rates in week 22 were $2.51 per kilo, up 1% week on week and 7% year on year, and significantly above pre-COVID levels, up 42% compared to May 2019.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: June 6, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Operations – Canada]

  • Border-Agent Union Negotiations: The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) will be in a legal strike position as of June 6. The majority of the members are considered essential and can not legally perform “work to rule action” or intentionally slow down trade. A simple 5-10 min delay off the normal average crossing time could have a large cumulative effect. Importers should expect to experience delays with their imports if a strike is called.
  • Canadian Rail Negotiations: The Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) has directed the Teamsters National Rail Conference (TCRC), the Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific Kansas City (CPKC) to provide final replies by June 14, which could mean a CIRB decision and possibly a strike, by the end of the month.The Teamsters National Rail Conference (TCRC) union has vowed to strike at the earliest opportunity after the CIRB ruling, and there have been no negotiations in the meantime. The CN, CPKC and the Canadian International Forwarders Association (CIFA) have requested a longer period than 72 hours from decision for strike to be able to occur.

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • The early peak conditions for Transpacific Eastbound Ocean freight that we entered in the month of May continue through the first part of June with volumes expected to be +10% higher YoY.
  • Floating rates: All general rate increases for the month of May have stuck with further rounds to be implemented on all Transpacific Eastbound gateways based on the peak conditions we are seeing in June. Carriers expect these rate hikes to stick and accelerate in the short term since vessels leaving Asia are expected to be full through June – Pacific Southwest is full, Pacific Northwest is close to full into the end of month and into June. Particularly Vietnam + South/East China (Yantian/Shanghai/Ningbo) into the Pacific Southwest is especially tight.
  • Fixed rates: Carriers implemented a Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) on June 1, and it is likely that the PSS will be increased again on June 15. More updates to come shortly as plans are finalized.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • The market continues to tighten and space is constrained at least up until the end of June, trending to July. Multiple factors are at play including port congestion, equipment shortages, and the continued delays on vessels rerouting via Cape of Good Hope resulting in low reliability and blank sailings reported out of Asia intensifying the situation.
  • Port congestion in Asia remains severe mainly due to high yard utilization, unexpected bad weather and vessel bunching, leading to low terminal operation efficiency and long waiting times, causing last-minute port omission by carriers to catch up with the transit time.
  • Demand continues to be stronger than usual and rates rose again for the first half of June followed by another increase for the second half of June ($1,000 – $2,000 increase per 40-foot container). We expect the increase in demand to be driven not only by consumer demand but also by companies building stock due to the longer than anticipated lead times and companies trying to secure space.
  • Carriers are increasing the Peak Season Surcharge (PSS) quantum to $1000-1500/TEU aiming for existing long term fixed deals.
  • Shippers continue to push cargo for earlier departure to avoid further freight cost increases. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are full. To push cargo on sooner ETD (estimated time of departure) and avoid delays, more carriers are open to Premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Flexport continues to monitor the situation and we advise to book early, place bookings in smaller lots, and pick up empty containers as soon as possible. For urgent cargo with a target delivery date, it is recommended to move on the Premium option as early as possible.
  • Read more about the situation in Why Ocean Freight Rates are Surging: A Look at the Supply Shock after the Red Sea Disruptions.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Container availability for inland U.S. exporters has become much more challenging. This is a result of the global disruptions in container shipping and their subsequent impact to the flow of laden and empty containers.
  • The extended transit times seen due to routing around Cape of Good Hope, growing port congestion at key ports, further devolves the container equipment situation for U.S. exporters, especially shippers loading at inland rail points.
  • Congestion at key destination transhipment hubs for U.S. exporters include Asia Base Ports and Strait of Gibraltar ports Tanger-Med and Algeciras.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, Flexport recommends booking 3-4 weeks in advance for bookings loading at a coastal port, and 4+ weeks in advance for bookings loading at an inland rail point.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Rates: Global air cargo rates have surpassed 2023 levels for the first time this year, with an average increase of 4%. However, this is partly due to strong demand from Asia Pacific with higher rates. Notably, rates are significantly higher than pre-pandemic levels, sitting at 41% above May 2019.
  • Tonnages: Global tonnages are up 9% YoY, primarily driven by Asia Pacific (+16%) and Middle East & South Asia (+14%). However, there was a slight decrease of 2% last week.
  • Capacity: Capacity remains stable globally but has grown 7% compared to the same period last year. Central & South America saw a substantial decrease (-17%) due to airlines removing capacity used for Mother’s Day flower shipments.
  • Regional Highlights: Dubai to Europe shows significant YoY tonnage growth (+26%) driven by sea-air cargo demand. Both Asia Pacific and Middle East & South Asia continue double-digit YoY growth (+16% and +14% respectively).
  • Post-holiday impact: The recent tonnages reflect a recovery from China’s Labor Day and Golden Week holidays. While Asia Pacific shows an 8% increase, half can be attributed to Golden Week.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: May 30, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • We have entered peak conditions for Transpacific Eastbound Ocean freight in the month of May. May imports are up +6.8% YoY and we do not expect this increase in demand to subside through the traditional peak season (expect June imports to be 10.7% higher YoY).
  • Floating rates: The 1H May $1000 GRI stuck, and we expect another $1000 GRI to be implemented on all Transpacific Eastbound gateways based on the peak conditions we are seeing in May. Carriers expect these rate hikes to stick and accelerate in the short term since vessels leaving Asia are expected to be full through May/June – Pacific Southwest is full, Pacific Northwest is close to full into EOM and into June. Particularly Vietnam + South/East China (Yantian/Shanghai/Ningbo) into the Pacific Southwest is especially tight.
  • Fixed rates: Starting June 1, carriers will implement a Peak Season Surcharge (PSS), and it is likely that the PSS will be increased again on June 15th. More updates to come later this month as plans are finalized.
  • Importers expect a tough peak season, and are trying to head ahead of uncertainties. For more insights, read this thread by Ryan Petersen, CEO of Flexport on X.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • The market continues to tighten and space is constrained at least up until mid-June. Multiple factors are at play including port congestion, equipment shortages and the continued delays on vessels rerouting via Cape of Good Hope resulting in low reliability and blank sailings reported out of Asia intensifying the situation.
  • Demand continues to be stronger than usual and rates rose again for the first half of June followed by another increase for the second half of June ($1,000 increase per 40-foot container). We expect the increase in demand to be driven not only by consumer demand but also by companies building stock due to the longer than anticipated lead times and companies trying to secure space.
  • Shippers continue to push cargo for earlier departure to avoid further freight cost increases. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are full. To push cargo on sooner ETD (estimated time of departure) and avoid delays, more carriers are open to Premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Flexport continues to monitor the situation and we advise to book early, place bookings in smaller slots and pick up empty containers as soon as possible. For urgent cargo with a target delivery date, it is recommended to move on the Premium option as early as possible.
  • Read more about the situation in Why Ocean Freight Rates are Surging: A Look at the Supply Shock after the Red Sea Disruptions.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Container availability for inland U.S. exporters has become much more challenging. This is a result of the global disruptions in container shipping and their subsequent impact to the flow of laden and empty containers.
  • The extended transit times seen due to routing around Cape of Good Hope, growing port congestion at key ports, further devolves the container equipment situation for U.S. exporters, especially shippers loading at inland rail points.
  • Congestion at key destination transhipment hubs for U.S. exporters include Asia Base Ports and Strait of Gibraltar ports Tanger-Med and Algeciras.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, Flexport recommends booking 3-4 weeks in advance for bookings loading at a coastal port, and 4+ weeks in advance for bookings loading at an inland rail point.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Tonnage and Rate Increases: Worldwide air cargo tonnages rebounded by +2% in week 20, following a similar increase the previous week. Average global rates slightly rose to $2.48 per kilo in week 20, up +2% YoY and +40% from May 2019 levels. Tonnages from Middle East & South Asia to Europe increased by +31% YoY in the last two weeks, with Dubai leading at +148%.
  • Regional Rate Variations: Middle East & South Asia to Europe rates remain more than double (+119%) YoY. Rates from Bangladesh to Europe reached $4.66 per kilo in week 20, nearly triple (+186%) YoY. India to Europe rates, though slightly eased, are still up +163% YoY at $3.72 per kilo.
  • Asia Pacific Dynamics: Tonnages from Asia Pacific origins are up +15% YoY with rates up +10%. China to Europe tonnages increased by +19% and +10% in weeks 19 and 20, while Hong Kong to Europe tonnages rose +31% YoY.
  • Market-Specific Developments: Vietnam to Europe rates doubled (+120%) YoY, exceeding $4 per kilo over the last eight weeks. Japan saw the largest 2Wo2W tonnage increase among top destination markets (+16%) post-Golden Week holiday.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicator Across All Major Trade Lanes Increases Again

Week to May 27, 2024
This week, the Ocean Timeliness Indicator for all major trade lanes continued the increasing trend seen throughout May. The China to the U.S. East Coast OTI increased to 55 Days, the China to Northern Europe OTI increased to 64 days due to routing around the Cape of Good, and the China to the U.S. West Coast OTI increased to 36 days

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: May 23, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • We have entered peak conditions for Transpacific Eastbound Ocean freight in the month of May. May imports are up +6.8% YoY and we do not expect this increase in demand to subside through the traditional peak season (expect June imports to be 10.7% higher YoY).
  • Floating rates: The 1H May $1000 GRI stuck, and we expect another $1000 GRI is being implemented on all Transpacific Eastbound gateways based on the peak conditions we are seeing in May. Carriers expect these rate hikes to stick and accelerate in the short term since vessels leaving Asia are expected to be full through May/June – Pacific Southwest is full, Pacific Northwest is close to full into EOM and into June. Particularly Vietnam + South/East China (Yantian/Shanghai/Ningbo) into the Pacific Southwest is especially tight
  • Fixed rates: Starting June 1, carriers will implement a Peak Season Surcharge (PSS), and it is likely that the PSS will be increased again on June 15th. More updates to come later this month as plans are finalized.
  • Importers expect a tough peak season, and are trying to head ahead of uncertainties. For more insights, read this thread by Ryan Petersen, CEO of Flexport on X.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • The market continues to tighten and space is constrained at least up until mid-June. Multiple factors are at play including port congestion, equipment shortages and the continued delays on vessels rerouting via Cape of Good Hope resulting in low reliability and blank sailings reported out of Asia intensifying the situation (three from Ocean Alliance as voided and one from MSC as slide-down).
  • Demand continues to be stronger than usual and rates rose again as the 2nd half May rate increases stuck. We expect the increase in demand to be driven not only by consumer demand but also by companies building stock due to the longer than anticipated lead times and companies trying to secure space. Further rate increases are announced for the first half of June ($1,000 per 40-foot container), which considering the situation, are expected to hold.
  • Shippers continue to push cargo for earlier departure to avoid further freight cost increase. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are full. To push cargo on sooner ETD (estimated time of departure) and avoid delays, more carriers are open to Premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Flexport continues to monitor the situation and we advise to book early, place bookings in smaller slots and pick up empty containers as soon as possible.
  • Read more about the situation in Why Ocean Freight Rates are Surging: A Look at the Supply Shock after the Red Sea Disruptions.

[Ocean – U.S. Exports]

  • Container availability for inland U.S. exporters is becoming much more challenging. This is a result of the global disruptions in container shipping and their subsequent impact to the flow of laden and empty containers.
  • The extended transit times seen due to routing around Cape of Good Hope, growing port congestion at key ports, further devolves the container equipment situation for U.S. exporters, especially shippers loading at inland rail points.
  • To ensure the smoothest loading experience, recommend booking 3-4 weeks in advance.

[Operations – Canada]

  • The Teamsters Canada Rail Conference initiated industrial action against Canadian National Railway and Canadian Pacific Kansas City following five months of failed negotiations, prompting Minister of Labour Seamus O’Regan to seek clarity from the Canadian Industrial Relations Board on essential rail services, with a decision expected by May 31, thereby preventing a strike on May 22.
  • The BC Maritime Employers Association and International Longshore and Warehouse Union Ship and Dock Foreman Local 514 engaged in negotiations last week with the support of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The 21-day cooling-off period ended on May 10 and now both sides are free to initiate a strike or lockout with 72-hour notice. As of May 23, neither party has issued a 72-hour notice for strike or lockout, ensuring uninterrupted cargo and passenger operations at British Columbia’s ports.

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Tonnage and Demand Volatility: Air cargo demand from Asia Pacific partially rebounded in week 19, but the rebound was weaker compared to last year. Global tonnages remained higher YoY, despite the volatility caused by holidays such as China’s Labor Day, Easter, and Eid.
  • Weekly Tonnage Analysis: Worldwide tonnages were flat in week 19, following a -9% drop in week 18 due to public holidays. This contrasts with last year’s +9% rebound in week 19 after a -9% decline in week 18.
  • Regional Tonnage Trends: Asia Pacific tonnages showed an +8% recovery in week 19 after a -13% decline in week 18, with significant YoY growth (+14% in week 19). North America and MESA (Middle East & South Asia) saw minor week-on-week recoveries (+1%), while Africa, Europe, and CSA (Central & South America) experienced further declines.
  • Pricing Trends: Average worldwide rates remained stable at $2.49/kg in week 19, a +2% increase YoY and +41% above May 2019 levels. Combined global rates for weeks 18 and 19 were up slightly on both a 2Wo2W (+1%) and YoY (+3%) basis, with significant YoY increases from MESA (+44%) and Asia Pacific (+12%).

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators for China to US East Coast Increases While Other Major Trade Lanes Remain Stagnant

Week to May 20, 2024
This week, the OTI for China to the US East Coast increased to 54 Days while China to Northern Europe remained stagnant at 62 days due to routing around the Cape of Good, and the OTI for China to the U.S. West Coast remained at 35 days.

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: May 16, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • The Red Sea situation continues to be chaotic with vessels rerouting via the Cape of Good Hope, impacting on-time performance and schedule reliability.
  • Bookings remain strong after the Chinese Labor Holiday. Another round of GRI (General Rate Increase) for the second half of May is confirmed for $1000 per 40-foot container. Shippers are pushing cargo for earlier departure to avoid further freight cost increase. Unless space has already been secured, all vessels are full. To push cargo on sooner ETD (estimated time of departure) and avoid delays, more carriers are open to Premium options to get cargo loaded on the first available departure date with higher equipment priority.
  • Carriers announced more blank sailings coming in June (three from Ocean Alliance as voided and one from MSC as slide-down).
  • Carriers are also trying to push for another GRI for the first half of June, considering the current over-demand. Flexport will continue to monitor the market developments.
  • More equipment shortages were reported by CMA/Evergreen/Hapag Lloyd/Yangming/HMM. Foreseeing the situation will be tough through May until empty containers are fully recovered. It is highly recommended to pick up containers right after the container yard opens, or as soon as EIR (Equipment Interchange Receipt) is available to print per carrier local practice. Don’t wait till the last minute!

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Global Tonnage Decline: Worldwide air cargo tonnages decreased by 12% WoW in the week starting April 29, primarily impacted by China’s Labor Day holiday and Japan’s Golden Week, with significant WoW declines in Asia Pacific (-16%) and moderate falls in other regions, including Europe and Central & South America.
  • Rate and Demand Variances: Despite overall tonnage declines, demand and rates from the Middle East & South Asia (MESA) to Europe remain high, with average global rates rising slightly by 1% from the previous week to $2.51 per kilogram.
  • Public Holiday Impact: The week’s tonnage fall was largely due to public holidays like China’s Labor Day, which affected multiple regions including Europe, Asia, and Africa. Adjusting for Japan’s Golden Week and post-peak flower shipments, the global decline would moderate from -12% to -9%.
  • Regional Rate and Tonnage Trends: Year-on-year analysis shows substantial growth in tonnages and rates, particularly from the MESA region to Europe, with significant rate increases also seen from India and Dubai to Europe, reflecting continued strong demand and regional supply chain disruptions.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators Increase Across All Major Trade Lanes

Week to May 13, 2024
This week, the OTI for all major trade lanes increased with China to Northern Europe increasing to 62 days due to routing around the Cape of Good Hope, the OTI for China to the U.S. West Coast increasing to 36 days, and the OTI for China to the U.S. East Coast increasing to 52 days.

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Source from Flexport.com

Freight Market Update: May 9, 2024

Trends to Watch

[Ocean – TPEB]

  • The shipping year began on May 1 with a strong General Rate Increase. This increase in the spot shipping rates was due to strong U.S. import demand and the renewal of long-term fixed contracts, resulting in vessels sailing at or near capacity.
  • The Panama Canal Authority announced another increase in daily transits. Shipping lines, however, remain cautious about re-deploying capacity through the canal as demand for ships on westbound (via Cape of Good Hope) transits remain high and vessel weight restrictions remain in place.
  • We are keeping an eye on the Canadian railroad contract negotiations. The railway union has announced a possible strike beginning on May 22. A strike would impact all rail services within Canada on both Canadian National and CPKCS railways.

[Ocean – FEWB]

  • The Red Sea situation continues to be chaotic with vessels rerouting via the Cape of Good Hope, impacting on-time performance and schedule reliability. Vessels on the water are still at risk of drone attacks. Vessels routed via the Mediterranean Sea might be impacted. We’re closely working with liners for any further deployment updates.
  • Bookings remain strong after the Chinese Labor Holiday. Another round of GRI (General Rate Increase) for the second half of May is scheduled for $1000 per 40-foot container. Shippers are pushing cargo for earlier departure to avoid further freight cost increases. For now, vessels are projected full through Week 21 (the last week of May). Week 22 is also filling up. It is highly recommended to place bookings four weeks in advance if possible.
  • More equipment shortages were reported by CMA/Evergreen/Hapag Lloyd/Yangming/HMM. Foreseeing the situation will be tough through May until empty containers are fully recovered. It is highly recommended to pick up containers right after the container yard opens, or as soon as EIR (Equipment Interchange Receipt) is available to print per carrier local practice. Don’t wait till the last minute!

[Ocean – FCL U.S. Exports]

  • Capacity is available for base-port to base-port moves to Asia, North Europe and Mediterranean ports of discharge.
  • Some inland rail locations are spotty on equipment related to global disruption of container flows. When booking to load at an inland rail point, shippers are encouraged to submit bookings 3-4 weeks in advance of CRD (cargo ready date).

[Air – Global] (Data Source: WorldACD)

  • Air cargo tonnages from Central & South America (CSA) surged in the final week of April, primarily driven by the upcoming Mother’s Day in North America and other regions. This surge was notably fueled by flower growers, retailers, and logistics providers shipping in flowers ahead of the celebrations.
  • According to the latest weekly figures from WorldACD Market Data, total worldwide tonnages rose by a further 5% in week 17 (22-28 April), following a 4% increase in week 16. This growth trend helped offset previous declines experienced in the preceding weeks due to various holiday periods like Easter and Eid.
  • Average worldwide air cargo rates slightly dropped by 1% to US$2.47 per kilo in week 17, dipping fractionally below the level observed in the equivalent week last year (US$2.52). However, rates still remain notably higher compared to pre-COVID levels, showing a 37% increase compared to April 2019.
  • Analysis by WorldACD indicates that outbound tonnages from CSA to North America rose by 48% on a 2-week comparison basis, primarily driven by the demand for flowers ahead of Mother’s Day. This surge in export traffic from CSA accounted for around 30% of the worldwide growth recorded in week 17.
  • Pricing patterns also saw significant shifts, with rates from CSA to North America experiencing a 12% rise, contributing to a 6% overall increase in total air export rates from CSA. Additionally, Asia Pacific outbound rates increased by 7% year-on-year, while rates from MESA to Europe soared by 42%, attributed to strong demand and supply disruptions in container shipping.
  • Certain Asia-Europe sea-air hubs, notably Dubai, have been experiencing exceptionally high air cargo demand to Europe since the beginning of the year, largely due to disruptions in Asia-Europe container shipping. Despite slight fluctuations due to holiday periods and other disruptions, demand for air cargo from these hubs remains robust, indicating ongoing challenges in sea freight reliability.

Please reach out to your account representative for details on any impacts to your shipments.

North America Vessel Dwell Times

 

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Flexport Ocean Timeliness Indicator

Ocean Timeliness Indicators Decrease for China to Europe but increase for China to U.S. West and East Coasts

Week to May 9, 2024
This week, the OTI for China to Northern Europe increased to 61 days, due to routing around the Cape of Good Hope and the OTI for China to the U.S. West Coast increased to 35 days. The OTI for China to the U.S. East Coast remained stagnant at 51 days.

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